Dr. Christine Wiedinmyer, Scientist III

Here I am in Northern Ghana working with a woman to test a new, more efficient stove that is expected to produce less smoke than her traditional stove.

above: Christine in Northern Ghana working with a woman to test a new, more efficient stove that is expected to produce less smoke than her traditional stove.

 

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above: Christine talking with children in Ghana, right: Christine goes to Washington, D.C. to discuss her research with law makers

 

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Education & Experience

2001-Present:  Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

2001: Research Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via University of Colorado’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science

2000 – 2001: Research Faculty at the University of Denver

1999: Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of Texas at Austin

1994: B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA

My interests

I am an atmospheric chemist, and I study the emissions of air pollutants to the atmosphere and their impact in the atmosphere. I try to understand wildfire emissions, emissions from plants, and from human activities. I also participates in studies that look at the interactions between emissions, air quality and health outcomes. In my free time, I spend a lot of my time with my two kids, Maggie and Finn. I also like to get outside, to run or to just read. I am also a women’s lacrosse official and I officiate games around Colorado.

How I became a scientist

I have always liked math and science throughout school. I had originally thought I would be a medical doctor and went to college thinking that was my goal. I fortunately signed up for the engineering program and was convinced to be a chemical engineer (where I could complete my pre-med prerequisites while getting a degree that would enable me to get a decent job after college if needed. I realized that I LOVED my engineering classes and not the biology/pre-med classed. I also realized I could go to grad school in engineering for free – so I made that my mission. In graduate school, I was fortunate to find an advisor and a research topic (air quality) that I loved. And I have been able to pursue it since. I love the science because I love the flexibility in the job, the freedom to pursue interesting topics and the possibility to make a difference.

How my work benefits society

My research projects focus on understanding the impacts of different sources of pollution to the atmosphere, so that we can develop the most effective air pollution control strategies. This is important across the US and around the world.
Check out a current project I have looking at the way people cook in Northern Ghana.